Posted by: Jonjon | July 17, 2009

No Time Bread 8.5/10




No Time Bread 8.5/10

July 17 2009 – 1 loaf


http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/quick/recipe-notime-bread-042531


Ingredients
4% active dry yeast, 2% sugar, 81% water, 1.7% salt, 0.5% vinegar

4 1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast (two packets) 18g 6g
1 tablespoon sugar 12g 1 teaspoon
1 1/2 cups water 354g 1/2 cup water
3 1/2 cups bread flour 436g = 145g 1.16 cup
1 1/4 teaspoon salt 7.8g 0.41 teaspoon
3/4 teaspoon balsamic vinegar 1/4 teaspoon

Method
In the bowl of a heavy-duty stand mixer put the yeast, sugar, and water and let it sit.

Heat the oven to 450°F. Put a Dutch oven (or one of these alternatives) in to warm as the oven heats. Get out your flour, salt, vinegar, spray oil, and anything else you need.
Now that the yeast has had a few minutes to bubble up, add 3 cups of the flour as well as the salt and vinegar and beat for several minutes with the paddle. Add the last 1/2 cup of flour and switch to the dough hook and beat for seven minutes. Alternately, knead vigorously for five minutes, or until the dough becomes extremely elastic. This will still be a wet dough, but not goopy. The dough will clear the sides of the bowl but still stick to the bottom
Oil a microwave-safe bowl and transfer the bread dough to it, rolling it in the oil. Cover the bowl with a very wet towel. Cover the whole thing with a dry towel and put in the microwave for 25 seconds.
Let rest in the microwave for about five minutes.
Microwave for another 25 seconds, then remove.
Let rest and rise for another 15 minutes.
Shape into a ball and plop into the preheated pan. Quickly slash the top with a knife. Cover and bake for about 30 minutes, then remove the cover and bake for another 10 minutes, or until the crust is golden brown and the internal temperature hits 210.

Conclusion
This recipe had 4x more yeast than the usual kind of bread. In terms of the texture, as with most breads baked in a dutch oven (in my case, a glass pot with a lid) you get a very crispy skin. Umm, the texture was…spongy rather than chewy after it cooled, kinda like the normal kind of bread I guess. Nothing spectacular hmmm, I think, was a bit cake like when it was warm though. However, the two textures, the crunchy skin and soft inside made it perfect for dips. Using dry yeast instead of instant yeast really brought out the yeast smell, which at first I thought was a bit intrusive, but after baking it was more of a vinegar fragrance (which also came from the balsamic vinegar). Interesting recipe this one.

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